Yet again, I’m going to post about something related to my employer. Yet again, I’m going to reiterate that this is not an official Red Hat position. In fact, I more than half expect I’ll get in trouble for saying it, but it just had to be said. You see, there’s a discussion on Slashdot about How Can I Justify Using Red Hat When CentOS Exists? The poster wants the functionality of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, but the CIO doesn’t want to pay for it and demands that they use CentOS instead. A lot of people have tried to explain the various aspects of what a RHEL subscription gets you. I’m not going to expand or correct those comments, because that will definitely get me in trouble and partly because I just don’t care. Here’s the reason that apparently carries no weight at all with CIOs and never even occurs to Slashdotters.

Because it’s the fucking right thing to do, you assholes.

Yeah, I used profanity on what has almost always been a family-friendly blog. I did that because it’s so utterly infuriating that such an obvious and important principle has totally escaped notice elsewhere. If you value something, you pay for it. Even the worst free-market zealots claim to believe that. They often use the same rationale to justify eliminating regulations (especially environmental ones) or replacing public aid with private charity. Red Hat folks do more work than anyone to improve the Linux kernel, GNOME, and dozens of other projects. They write the code, do the testing, fix the bugs, write the documentation, and provide all kinds of logistical support. The beneficiaries include not just obvious derivatives like CentOS and Scientific but even commercial competitors from Oracle and Amazon’s obvious clones to completely separate distributions like Ubuntu which also package that code and fixes. This work isn’t done by volunteers. It costs a lot of money. The fact that we allow the code to be distributed for free should have nothing to do with the principle that you pay for what you value. When you violate that principle you ensure that there will be less of what you value. The result will be a net loss for everyone, as less innovation occurs and more energy is wasted making sure everyone’s “intellectual property” remains under lock and key. Even the thieves lose.

I’d really like to hear from someone who can offer a better moral justification than “we can so we should” for using CentOS on thousands of machines without paying for even one RHEL subscription, because nothing I’ve heard so far is even close. “Duty to maximize profits” arguments will be deleted, because I’ve already turned that one into swiss cheese enough times in my life. Does anybody seriously believe that freeloading should be on the “good” side of our collective moral map?