There seems to be a growing awareness that there’s something odd about the recent election. “How did Obama win the presidential race but Republicans get control of the House?” seems to be a common question. People who have never said “gerrymandering” are saying it now. What even I hadn’t realized was this (emphasis mine).

Although the Republicans won 55 percent of the House seats, they received less than half of the votes for members of the House of Representatives.
 – Geoffrey R. Stone

What does this have to do with Big Data? This is not a technical problem. Mostly I think it’s a problem that needs to be addressed at the state level, for example by passing ballot measures requiring that district boundaries be set by an independent directly-elected commission. Maybe those members could even be elected via Approval Voting or Single Transferable Vote – systems which IMO should actually be used to elect the congresscritters themselves, but that’s not feasible without establishing voter familiarity in a different context.

Here’s the technical part. Most of the Big Data “success stories” seem to involve the rich (who can afford to buy/run big clusters) getting richer by exploiting consumers and invading their privacy. Very rarely do I hear about good uses, such as tracking drug interactions or disease spread. Where are the “data scientists” doing real science? Here’s an opportunity, while the election and its consequences are fresh in everybody’s minds, for those tools to do some good. How about if we use Big Data tools and Machine Learning techniques to crunch through demographic data and at least come up with congressional-district proposals that meet some rationally debatable definition of fairness? Obviously the results themselves can’t just be used as is, nor can the algorithms or data sets be enshrined into law, but maybe at least the operative definitions and the results they produce can provide decent starting points for a commission or the people themselves to consider. It seems like a lot better goal than targeting ads, anyway.